Read Diverse Books Year-Round – Final Edition

This really is my last review link-up, y’all! For the year at least. 🙂

November’s post, the penultimate RDB Year-Round link-up, had 46 reviews. As always, I’m eternally grateful for your consistency in reviewing diverse books and promoting them on your blogs. I would announce November’s winner right now, but it seems I accidentally set the closing time for the link-up at the end of December 1st instead of November 30th. So the winner will be announced tomorrow and I will update the post.

Mini Reviews: Fantasy Novellas Written by Asian Women (Part 1)

These reviews actually include a mix of novellas, short stories, and novelletes, but I only mentioned novellas in the title for simplicity’s sake.

Many of you know that I adore Fantasy, I have since I was a child. But it was not until recently that I started exploring Fantasy written by a more diverse group of writers. And let me tell you what a wonderful and refreshing experience it has been! With a variety of voices comes a greater variety of different narrative styles and the stories they choose to tell.

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My Dumbledore’s Army Readathon Sign Up, TBR, & Book Recommendations!

If you have not heard about it already, let me introduce you now to one of the most wonderful and exciting readathons I’ve seen in a while. The Dumbledore’s Army Readthon was created by Aentee from Read At Midnight. Its goal is to promote and uplift marginalized voices by encouraging readers & bloggers to read diverse books as a community event. The readathon will start on January 1st 2017 and ends on January 15th, midnight to midnight.

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An Interview With Publisher Yali Books & A Book Giveaway!

Today, I’m honored to have Yali Books for an interview and a giveaway of one of their recent YA releases. If you haven’t heard about Yali Books, I featured them in a previous post highlighting independent presses that promote diversity. Yali Books continues to do excellent work in Children’s Literature and I hope this interview will bring attention to the important and necessary work they are doing.

Their giveaway package includes: a copy of The Sorcerer of Mandala, a bookmark (word search puzzle), a visual folding puzzle, and a tree ornament for the holidays!

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The Rapid Fire Book Tag

I warn you now, this tag is HUGE.

I don’t understand why the creator asked so many questions, but I answered them all anyway. It’s been a while since my last book tag, so I figured it was time. Hope some of my answers resonate with you!

I tagged myself after reading Donna’s tag. I say you tag yourself too. 🙂

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Review – The Unintentional Time Traveler by Everett Maroon

One of the most egregious gaps in my reading history is books written by or about transgender people. In September I finished the fabulous audiobook by Janet Mock, Redefining Realness, and reviewed it a few weeks ago. but before that, nothing. Then in October, I finally got around to reading The Unintentional Time Travel by Everett Maroon, which was recommended to me by a few people and had been praised by one of the co-founders of GayYA.org. The blurb promises an action-packed and exciting adventure with time travel and a complex exploration of gender identity. So I knew I had to read it.

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Audiobook Giveaway: Signal To Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Hello, everyone! Today, I have a surprise giveaway.

Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s debut novel Signal To Noise is now available in audio and she’s collaborating with Read Diverse Books to do a very generous giveaway for the audiobook readers out there! Signal To Noise is a critically-acclaimed novel about friendship, family, love, and music all infused with a bit of magic. Two lucky people will win an audio code from Audible.com. Good luck to you all. 🙂

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2016 Book Releases by Native Americans To Read Before And After The Year Ends

This post is in honor of Native American Heritage Month, which runs all the through November. As with Latinx Heritage Month, I want to again stress that months of targeted celebration are important but we should never limit exploration of certain voices and stories to those months.

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Review: Reputations by Juan Gabriel Vásquez

Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s Reputations was originally published in 2006 in the author’s native Spanish. Ten years after publication, English-speakers finally get the chance to read this novel by the award-winning and often-lauded Colombian writer. I don’t read nearly enough translated fiction, especially from South American authors, so Reputations sounded like the perfect book for me.

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Q&A With Yi Shun Lai, Author of “Not A Self-Help Book”

Last week I reviewed Yi Shun Lai’s Not A Self-Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu and let me once again recommend it to you all. If you’re a fan of epistolary novels, this book is a must-must read. It has a unique voice and plot, with memorable characters and complex relationships. The mother-daughter relationship is especially complicated and nuanced. If you read and review Not A Self-Help Book, I’d love to know your thoughts on this aspect of the novel. There’s also a good mix of humor and serious moments, with a dose of family drama to top it off. It’s difficult not to find something in this novel that you’ll like!

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[Review] Not A Self-Help Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu – by Yi Shun Lai

I have never read a self-help book myself, at least not all the way through, but I’ve heard that they’re a multi-billion dollar industry just in the U.S. alone. It seems Americans are willing to spend big money on self-improvement or ways to “fix” themselves. I can certainly see the appeal. Who doesn’t want to be the best version of themselves? Some people’s problems run too deep, however, and may need more than a couple of self-help books found in the Barnes & Noble bargain section. Marty Wu is someone with a complicated life who also sees the appeal of self-help books. In fact, this novel itself is a collection of diary entries that were motivated by a self-help book she found in the used-book section of a local bookstore. This book is called “The Language of Paying Attention to YOU,” which has a silly title, but has resonated profoundly with Marty Wu, as she constantly refers to the advice it offers.

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My Lit Box – November Unboxing

I subscribed to My Lit Box in June of 2016, immediately after I knew it existed because it is also devoted to promoting writers of color and diversity in the publishing industry. Supporting marginalized voices with our money, when we are able, is a powerful way to demonstrate that we want change in the industry . Some of that change should come from non-marginalized writers including diversity in their work and writing stories that reflect the world we live in. But for meaningful and structural change to occur in the long run, we need writers of color and other marginalized voices to thrive and succeed in the industry. Small businesses like My Lit Box is helping them do just that, which is why it has my full support.

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