9 Publishers Who Promote Diversity And Uplift Writers Of Color

We all know that getting published is difficult, but it’s even more so for writers of color, who often have to turn to independent publishers instead of bigger, traditional presses for a variety of reasons. Having less access to resources and industry connections, and being expected to write certain kinds of stories are only a few of the obstacles writers from marginalized backgrounds may face.

That we, as readers, should do our best to support Independent publishers goes without saying. They are a vital part of the publishing industry that offer opportunities to talented writers who may otherwise go unnoticed, or who must self-publish and face even more obstacles.

The following publishing companies are devoted to uplifting marginalized voices and providing quality literature that reflects the diversity of our world. These publishers focus on promoting writers of color, LGBTQ narratives, and women’s stories.

I encourage you to browse their websites and follow them on Twitter to keep up with the amazing work they are doing. It may not seem like much, but following publishing companies like these demonstrates there is an interest in and demand for their products. So show your support!


Cassava Republic

Founded in 2006, Cassava Republic is now an established publishing brand that focuses on African writers. Their mission is to “change the way we all think about African writing.” 

Cassava Republic

Notable Books

Season of Crimson Blossoms – Abubakar Ibrahim

Born on a Tuesday – Elnathan John

The Lazarus Effect – H.J. Golakai

Tiny Sunbirds Far Away – Christie Watson

Visit their website

 

 


Rosarium Publishing

Rosarium Publishing specializes in speculative fiction and comics “with a multicultural flair.”

 Rosarium PublishingNotable Books

The Assimilated Cuban’s Guide to Quantum Santeria – by Carlos Hernandez

Stories for Chip – by Nisi Shawl, Bill Campbell

The Sea is Ours: Tales of Steampunk Southeast Asia – by Jaymee Goh, Joyce Chng

Making Wolf – by Tade Thompson

 

Visit their website

 

Jacaranda Books

A London-based independent publisher that aims to reflect the ethnic and cultural diversity of the U.K. and uplift under-represented voices. 

Jacaranda Books

Notable Books

Butterfly Fish – by Irenosen Okojie

Tram 83 – by Fiston Mwanza Mujila

No More Heroes – by Stephen Thompson

Satans and Shaitans – Obinna  Udenwe

 

 

Visit their website

 

Lee & Low / Tu Books

Lee & Low Books is a renown, award-winning publisher of children’s books passionate about diversity. They focus on publishing contemporary stories that reflect the richness of today’s cultures. Tu Books is the Young Adult imprint of Lee & Low. 

Tu Books

Notable Books

Wolf Mark– by Joseph Bruchach

Tankborn – by Karen Sandler 

Ink and Ashes – by Valynne Maetani

Etched in Clay – by Andrea Cheng

 Visit their website

 

 


Agate Publishing

Agate Publishing is Chicago-based publisher that focuses on the works of African American writers, fiction and nonfiction.

Agate Publishing

Notable Books

Creatures Here Below – By O.H. Bennett 

The Burning City – by Alaya Dawn Johnson

Freshwater Road –  by Denise Nicholas

Bare-Knuckled Lit – by Ian Belknap

 

 

Visit their website

 

Yali Books

Yali Books is a growing independent publisher of children’s literature that focuses on South Asian cultures. 

Yali Books

 

Notable Books

Bye, Bye, Motabhai! – by Kala Sambasivan

The Sorcerer of Mandala – by D Kalyanaraman

Amla Mater – by Devi Menon

Jaipur Jamboree – by Kala Sambasivan

 

 

Visit their website

 

Riptide Publishing

Riptide Publishing aims to integrate positive LGBTQ representation in literature.

Riptide Books

Notable Books

Strange Angels – by Andrea Speed

The Empty Hourglassby Cornelia Grey

The Beginning of Us – Sarah Brooks

Wallflower – by Heidi Belleau

 

 

Visit their website

 

Shade Mountain Press

 

Shade Mountain Press specializes in literature written by women — particularly women of color, women with disabilities, women from working-class backgrounds, and women who identify queer/lesbian/bisexual. 

Shade Mountain Press

Notable Books

The Female Complaint: Tales of Unruly Women
– Edited by Rosalie Morales Kearnes

White Light – by Vanessa Garcia 

Not a Self-Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu – by Yi Shun Lai

Her Own Vietnam – by Lynn Kanter

Visit their website

 


Interlude Press

Interlude Press is committed to providing quality LGBT narratives that may not be printed elsewhere. They emphasize a strong author-reader community modeled after online fan cultures to offer a unique experiences to their readers. 

Interlude Press books

Notable Books

100 Days – by Mimsy Hale

Black Dust – by Lynn Charles

Not Your Sidekick – by C.B. Lee

The Better to Kiss You With – by Michelle Osgood

 

 

Visit their website

 


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46 thoughts on “9 Publishers Who Promote Diversity And Uplift Writers Of Color

  1. I continue to be amazed at the high caliber of content on this blog. This is seriously a value add to my inbox. This post in particular is stunning, just in its thoroughness. I especially enjoyed your “White Authors…” post. Made a lot of sense and helped me understand how to be supportive appropriately!

  2. Great post! Found four new book publishers to check out 🙂 By chance have you heard of, Arsenal Pulp Press? I’ve added a few books they’ve published to my diversity TBR pile recently.

  3. I would second Arsenal Pulp Press, which is definitely my favourite press. They’re based in Vancouver, so as a Canadian publisher that might be why you haven’t heard of them! It’s run by a queer Asian man, and they publish tons of all kinds of diverse books by women and/or POC and/or LGBTQ2IA. For example, they’ve published all of Vivek Shraya’s books and they published God in Pink by Hasan Namir, which one the Lambda for gay fiction this year. http://www.arsenalpulp.com/home.php
    Another Canadian press to check out would be Caitlin Press, which focuses on publishing women in British Columbia; they also have an imprint dedicated to queer and/or trans women called Dagger. http://caitlin-press.com/about-caitlin/

    1. No, I hadn’t heart Arsenal Pulp Press! Thanks for letting me know about it.
      This is is by no means a comprehensive one, just some that I have known about for a while. Perhaps I should have clarified that!
      Again, thank you for the recommendation. I will browse their catalogs today. 🙂

  4. Great post! It’s always good as a writer to be aware that these sorts of publishers exist. For my own experience, I’m currently submitting my novel to literary agents, but interestingly enough one of the agents I submitted to reps Tank Born which is from one of the publishers on this list, which certainly makes me feel better about the agent. Moreover it’s good to know that there are publishers out there that way to support marginalized voices and stories. Especially for those writers submitting directly to publishers instead of through lit agents.

  5. Excellent post once again Naz. Your dedication towards supporting and promoting diversity in reading/publishing amazes, inspires, and humbles me. This is a great signal boost for these presses that are doing good work. Nicely done, my friend.

  6. What a great post! I’ll have to check all these out! I have to admit that most of the small presses I’m familiar with are Canadian… There are just so many (which is a wonderful thing!).

      1. Yes, it is! You’ve made me think about writing a post about some of our small presses. I think it would be fun, – you know, if I can find the time… 🙂

      1. A good way to do that (I think I mentioned this somewhere before??) is to connect with SMALL presses by look at their catalogs (found on their websites) and then follow the authors on social media. I find more of them on Facebook that Twitter. They’re usually very thankful for the free press you provide because frequently PR work comes out of the author’s pocket. If you’re always reading books from BIG presses, you’re never going to connect with authors (basically, you find yourself 1 drop in an ocean of bloggers who also want the author to come chat on their blogs).

  7. I love independent presses! Thanks for sharing these. I’m going to check them out and see if they have any books that I need to add to my TBR list. Also, have you heard of Harmony Ink Press? They publish LGBTQ YA books. I haven’t bought any of their books yet because of my book-buying ban, but I was on their website, and some of their novels sound really good.

    1. That darn book-buying ban! When will you be free? haha
      No, I haven’t heard of Harmony Ink Press, so thanks for letting me know about them! Adding it to my every growing list of great indie presses. I hope it only keeps growing!

  8. Auch a great post, Naz!! I know some of these publishers mostly from you spreading the word on twitter and will now check out the others’ catalogues! I’m sure I’ll find some great ones to fill my shelves with😃

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