A ‘Wish for Someplace Else’: Latinx Poetry As Community

(A guest post by Iliana Rocha.)

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about poetry & its relationship to community, & the place I keep arriving at is that, for me, poetry is community.

One of the questions I get asked the most is why I turned to the genre in the first place: Why poetry? The unstated assumptions behind this question, I think, concern the supposed difficulty of it, supposed lack of contemporary relevance, supposed exclusivity.

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The Alien Consciousness of “Latin@ Rising”

Latin@ Rising: An Anthology of Latin@ Science Fiction and Fantasy is slated for release on February 1, 2017 through the San Antonio publisher Wings Press. The book, funded by a Kickstarter campaign, will be the first collection to give attention to the unique work of Latino/a speculative fiction writers and to serve their growing audience. The anthology attempts to be somewhat representative of speculative fiction, and so it is broad in scope and diverse in terms of authors and kinds of stories. The book contains authors who have been important to the development of Latino/a speculative fiction, such as Ernest Hogan, Junot Díaz, Daína Chaviano, and Ana Castillo, and it contains authors who are relatively new such as Alejandra Sanchez and Richie Narvaez

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What I’ve Taken Away From Talented LatinX Authors

A warning: you have probably already read the books in this list. They are brilliant. However, sometimes the baggage we the reader bring to a work of fiction can be just as fun as the actual written prose. Or, at the very least, our flawed perceptions when devouring a great work of fiction are embarrassing and amusing in equal measure. That’s kinda why book clubs in person and/or subreddits are so much fun.

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Guest Review: Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Esperanza Rising is a book I can wholeheartedly recommend to everyone. (How often do you get to say that?) It’s a middle-grade novel, published in 2000, and it won the Pura Belpré award, which is the award is named after Pura Belpré, the first Latina librarian at the New York Public Library. (From the ALA website: The award, established in 1996, is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.) This engaging, warm-hearted novel not only made me feel, it made me think, opening my eyes to a chapter of American history I’d regretfully never been aware of.

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Guest Review: The Moon In The Palace by Weina Dai Randel

A guest review by Adria J. Cimino.

#30Authors is an event started by The Book Wheel that connects readers, bloggers, and authors. In it, 30 authors review their favorite recent reads on 30 blogs in 30 days. It takes place annually during the month of September and has been met with incredible support from and success in the literary community. It has also been turned into an anthology, which is currently available on Amazon and all author proceeds go to charity. Previous #30Authors contributors include Celeste Ng, Cynthia Bond, Brian Panowich, and M.O. Walsh. To see this year’s full line-up, visit www.thebookwheelblog.com/30authors or follow along on Twitter @30Authors.

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