[Review] Deceit And Other Possibilities by Vanessa Hua

I’ve read many excellent short story collections and anthologies in 2016, all of them written by people of color or Indigenous people. But Vanessa Hua’s Deceit and Other Possibilities stands out as one of the finest one’s in my collection. One of the things I appreciate about short story collections is the variety that they innately offer and that is especially true in Hua’s stories. Not only are circumstances and scenarios presented in her stories wildly different from each other, there is also great diversity in the backgrounds of the characters around which the stories center.

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Mini Reviews: Fantasy Novellas Written by Asian Women (Part 1)

These reviews actually include a mix of novellas, short stories, and novelletes, but I only mentioned novellas in the title for simplicity’s sake.

Many of you know that I adore Fantasy, I have since I was a child. But it was not until recently that I started exploring Fantasy written by a more diverse group of writers. And let me tell you what a wonderful and refreshing experience it has been! With a variety of voices comes a greater variety of different narrative styles and the stories they choose to tell.

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Review – The Unintentional Time Traveler by Everett Maroon

One of the most egregious gaps in my reading history is books written by or about transgender people. In September I finished the fabulous audiobook by Janet Mock, Redefining Realness, and reviewed it a few weeks ago. but before that, nothing. Then in October, I finally got around to reading The Unintentional Time Travel by Everett Maroon, which was recommended to me by a few people and had been praised by one of the co-founders of GayYA.org. The blurb promises an action-packed and exciting adventure with time travel and a complex exploration of gender identity. So I knew I had to read it.

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Review: Reputations by Juan Gabriel Vásquez

Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s Reputations was originally published in 2006 in the author’s native Spanish. Ten years after publication, English-speakers finally get the chance to read this novel by the award-winning and often-lauded Colombian writer. I don’t read nearly enough translated fiction, especially from South American authors, so Reputations sounded like the perfect book for me.

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[Review] Not A Self-Help Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu – by Yi Shun Lai

I have never read a self-help book myself, at least not all the way through, but I’ve heard that they’re a multi-billion dollar industry just in the U.S. alone. It seems Americans are willing to spend big money on self-improvement or ways to “fix” themselves. I can certainly see the appeal. Who doesn’t want to be the best version of themselves? Some people’s problems run too deep, however, and may need more than a couple of self-help books found in the Barnes & Noble bargain section. Marty Wu is someone with a complicated life who also sees the appeal of self-help books. In fact, this novel itself is a collection of diary entries that were motivated by a self-help book she found in the used-book section of a local bookstore. This book is called “The Language of Paying Attention to YOU,” which has a silly title, but has resonated profoundly with Marty Wu, as she constantly refers to the advice it offers.

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Mini-Reviews: The Surrogate by Caille Millner & Redefining Realness by Janet Mock

I don’t often read audiobooks, so I figured I’d round up my two recent reads.
Both are great and earn my recommendation.

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Lez talk: a collection of black lesbian short fiction, by S. Andrea Allen

Review – Lez Talk: A Collection of Black Lesbian Short Fiction

Seeking new reading experiences is what I live for as a reader. I will always find comfort in reading my tried and true favorite genres and narratives, but I also regularly seek stories that are new to me and outside of my lived experience. That’s a major aspect of what I mean when I say “read diverse books.” It means to read books with narratives drastically different than your own and to read them with an open mind and respect.

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Review: Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova | #DSFFBookClub

I’ve wanted to read Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova the moment I knew it existed. Reading the book blurb promised brujas, “Deathday” celebrations, summoning the spirits of dead relatives, and a journey into the Wonderland-esque land of Los Lagos. Once I saw the cover, I was sure I had to read this book. It’s easily in my top 5 favorite covers of 2016. As for the story itself – did it live up to the hype and lofty expectations I created for it? Not quite, but it was still a hell of a fun ride.

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Review: The Marauders’ Island (Hen & Chick #1) by Tristan J. Tarwater & A Book Giveaway!

The Marauders’ Island is the kind of book that is so delightful and refreshing that you can’t help but share with everyone you know. During the week or so that I read it, I plastered the book’s image all over social media hoping it would reach as many people as possible. I want you to read this book! It has powerful mages, a diverse cast of characters, a gorgeous tropical setting, positive representation of LGBTQ people, a complex relationship between a mother and daughter, and so much more! All this goodness makes a reader like me giddy with joy.

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Guest Review: Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera

I want to give a huge thanks to Brendon from Gaming For Justice for cross-posting this wonderful review on my blog for Latinx Heritage Month .

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