[ARC Review] The Night Of The Virgin by Elliott Turner

The Night Of The Virgin tells the story of Emmaneul “Manny” Hernandez, a young soccer prodigy living in Texas who one day wants to become a professional soccer player. There’s one big problem, though — he’s undocumented. But his legal status will not crush his dreams entirely. One day, he and his best friend Hector leave their lives in Texas behind and head to California to see what surprises and opportunities life has in store for them there. Over the course of the novel, we will see Manny grow from a brash young man into a loving father, but before he gets from point A to point B Manny will experience many triumphs, failures, mistakes, and regrets.

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[Review] The Obelisk Gate by N.K. Jemisin

In 2016 I reviewed the Hugo Award winner for Best Novel, The Fifth Season. After a slow and difficult period of adjustment, due to narrative structure and writing style, this epic fantasy blew my socks off and quickly became one of the best books I read that year. It is an ambitious and dense, but incredibly rewarding novel if one invests the time and effort. The Obelisk Gate is a solid sophomore effort that continues the epic saga of this post-apocalyptic story in a way that promises great things for the series finale.

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Review: Reputations by Juan Gabriel Vásquez

Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s Reputations was originally published in 2006 in the author’s native Spanish. Ten years after publication, English-speakers finally get the chance to read this novel by the award-winning and often-lauded Colombian writer. I don’t read nearly enough translated fiction, especially from South American authors, so Reputations sounded like the perfect book for me.

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[Review] Not A Self-Help Help Book: The Misadventures of Marty Wu – by Yi Shun Lai

I have never read a self-help book myself, at least not all the way through, but I’ve heard that they’re a multi-billion dollar industry just in the U.S. alone. It seems Americans are willing to spend big money on self-improvement or ways to “fix” themselves. I can certainly see the appeal. Who doesn’t want to be the best version of themselves? Some people’s problems run too deep, however, and may need more than a couple of self-help books found in the Barnes & Noble bargain section. Marty Wu is someone with a complicated life who also sees the appeal of self-help books. In fact, this novel itself is a collection of diary entries that were motivated by a self-help book she found in the used-book section of a local bookstore. This book is called “The Language of Paying Attention to YOU,” which has a silly title, but has resonated profoundly with Marty Wu, as she constantly refers to the advice it offers.

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Lez talk: a collection of black lesbian short fiction, by S. Andrea Allen

Review – Lez Talk: A Collection of Black Lesbian Short Fiction

Seeking new reading experiences is what I live for as a reader. I will always find comfort in reading my tried and true favorite genres and narratives, but I also regularly seek stories that are new to me and outside of my lived experience. That’s a major aspect of what I mean when I say “read diverse books.” It means to read books with narratives drastically different than your own and to read them with an open mind and respect.

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Guest Review: Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera

I want to give a huge thanks to Brendon from Gaming For Justice for cross-posting this wonderful review on my blog for Latinx Heritage Month .

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The Alien Consciousness of “Latin@ Rising”

Latin@ Rising: An Anthology of Latin@ Science Fiction and Fantasy is slated for release on February 1, 2017 through the San Antonio publisher Wings Press. The book, funded by a Kickstarter campaign, will be the first collection to give attention to the unique work of Latino/a speculative fiction writers and to serve their growing audience. The anthology attempts to be somewhat representative of speculative fiction, and so it is broad in scope and diverse in terms of authors and kinds of stories. The book contains authors who have been important to the development of Latino/a speculative fiction, such as Ernest Hogan, Junot Díaz, Daína Chaviano, and Ana Castillo, and it contains authors who are relatively new such as Alejandra Sanchez and Richie Narvaez

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20+ Books To Read During AND After Latinx Heritage Month

Latinx Heritage Month kicks off today! I’m so excited to share a month’s worth of content with you all. I will have guest posts, author Q&As, bibliography spotlights, reviews, and giveaways! Don’t be alarmed, I will not be posting something new every day. My goal is to provide 3 posts per week, so I encourage you to stop by weekly to stay caught up.

I am grateful to the bloggers and the authors who collaborated with me to make this happen. With your help, my celebration of Latinx voices and stories has been amplified exponentially.

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Review: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

At 26 years old, Yaa Gyasi debuted on the literary scene with one of the most impressive releases of 2016. Homegoing is a multi-generational epic that covers such a large scope in only 300 page that you’re left wondering how anyone could accomplish this marvelous feat of storytelling so brilliantly and concisely. But Yaa Gyasi did accomplish this feat and was rewarded handsomely for it with a seven figure advance. I’m thrilled to meet Gyasi the writer at this point in her very promising career. You can be certain I will be watching everything she does, as I am already anticipating her next novel!

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