[Review] Signal To Noise – by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Signal To Noise begins in 2009 when Meche returns to Mexico City after her father’s death, leaving behind her quiet but comfortable life in Oslo, Norway. Meche is a Mexican native, but fled her home country and has not returned in twenty years, though for most of the book, we don’t know what drove her away for so long. However, it quickly becomes clear that it has something to do with her former friends Daniela and Sebastian, whom she has not spoken to since 1989. The mystery surrounding their friendship and the eventual dissolution of that friendship is fascinating, and Silvia Moreno-Garcia does an excellent job unraveling their story chapter by chapter, in alternating time periods.

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A Taste Of Honey by Kai Ashante Wilson – Review & Giveaway!

I can’t stress to you all how much Fantasy and Science-Fiction with LGBTQIA characters mean to me, especially those centering Queer people of color. So when I heard about Kai Ashante Wilson’s follow-up to Sorcerer of the Wildeeps, I was ecstatic. Gay romances set in fantasy worlds really get to me, y’all. I am so thankful to writers like Kai Ashante Wilson for being fearless and unapologetic in writing stories with Queer characters, especially in the current – hostile – political climate.

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“Problem Daughters” Anthology Is Open For Submissions And Needs Funding!

Problem Daughters will amplify the voices of women who are sometimes excluded from mainstream feminism. It will be an anthology of beautiful, thoughtful, unconventional speculative fiction and poetry around the theme of intersectional feminism, with a specific focus on the lives and experiences of women of colour, QUILTBAG women, disabled women, sex workers, and all intersection of these. Edited by Nicolette Barischoff, Rivqa Rafael and Djibril al-Ayad, the anthology will be published by Futurefire.net Publishing and is currently being crowdfunded and is open to submissions. Today, Rivqa and Nicolette talk about the value of anthologies for readers and writers, particularly marginalised writers.

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Review – The Unintentional Time Traveler by Everett Maroon

One of the most egregious gaps in my reading history is books written by or about transgender people. In September I finished the fabulous audiobook by Janet Mock, Redefining Realness, and reviewed it a few weeks ago. but before that, nothing. Then in October, I finally got around to reading The Unintentional Time Travel by Everett Maroon, which was recommended to me by a few people and had been praised by one of the co-founders of GayYA.org. The blurb promises an action-packed and exciting adventure with time travel and a complex exploration of gender identity. So I knew I had to read it.

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Latinx Heritage Month Wrap-Up

Once again, I want to thank all the wonderful and talented authors who collaborated with me to make this month-long celebration of Latinx voices a reality. I had never attempted a project of this scope and am happy with how it turned out. I could have been more organized, but I will focus on the positives instead and look forward to future projects. I hope to make next year’s celebration even better!

For now, here’s a wrap-up post of all the reviews, guest posts, Q&As, and author spotlights featured on my blog throughout Latinx Heritage Month. If you missed any of my posts, now’s your chance to catch up and discover new authors and poets!

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From Love, Community

A guest post by Sabrina Vourvoulias, author of the dystopian novel, “Ink.”

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The Alien Consciousness of “Latin@ Rising”

Latin@ Rising: An Anthology of Latin@ Science Fiction and Fantasy is slated for release on February 1, 2017 through the San Antonio publisher Wings Press. The book, funded by a Kickstarter campaign, will be the first collection to give attention to the unique work of Latino/a speculative fiction writers and to serve their growing audience. The anthology attempts to be somewhat representative of speculative fiction, and so it is broad in scope and diverse in terms of authors and kinds of stories. The book contains authors who have been important to the development of Latino/a speculative fiction, such as Ernest Hogan, Junot Díaz, Daína Chaviano, and Ana Castillo, and it contains authors who are relatively new such as Alejandra Sanchez and Richie Narvaez

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Review: Santa Muerte by Lucina Stone

I have always been fascinated by time travel stories, especially ones that feature people of color being sent to the racist past. Novels like Kindred by Octavia Butler and A Wish After Midnight by Zetta Elliott brilliantly illustrate the oppressiveness of institutionalized racism and how modern people are helpless under its weight no matter how brave and strong-willed they may be. These stories are brutally honest about the realities people of color faced before the Civil Rights movement. And they should be! Nothing infuriates me more than when young people, but especially young people of color, idealize 1920s or 1950s in American history. We should never forget how bleak and traumatic those times were for people of color.

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Interview: Lucina Stone, Author of “Santa Muerte”

This week, in anticipation of my review for Santa Muerte on Friday, I interviewed Lucina Stone because she wrote a book that immediately appealed to my interests as a reader. I simply had to know the person behind the story a little better. This book has witches/brujas, strong Latinas, time travel, mysterious realms and magic, as well as positive representation of same-sex parent households. Everything about this book screamed “READ ME.” So I did!

Stay tuned for my in-depth review later this week. In the meantime, read my Q&A with the author.

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