Queer Retellings, Aromanticism, and Centering Friendship in Your Narratives

Today, I’m happy to have author Claudie Arseneault on Read Diverse Books. Claudie is an important voice in the asexual and aromantic online communities . She is also behind the Aromantic and Asexual Speculative Fiction Database , which is fantastic resource for those seeking more books with aro and ace representation. Browse through the database, add some books to your TBR, and share it with others!

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[Guest Post] Writing Relationships As An Ace Author – by Rachel Sharp

Today, I want to welcome author Rachel Sharp to Read Diverse Books. She is a fun and interesting personality on Twitter who’s worth a follow. She also has a new book, Phaethon, out now! It’s an Urban Fantasy/ Tech Fantasy that nerds will love. Please read her guest post below about writing romance and sex scenes as an asexual author and then add her new novel, Phaethon, on Goodreads!

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White Authors – Fill Your Stories With People Of Color, But Don’t Make Them Your Protagonists

This is a letter for the well-meaning white authors who are considering including people of color in their stories.

If you are a white author who is serious and passionate about writing ethnically diverse characters into your work, please tread carefully. And please refrain from making your protagonists people of color.

I know, you’re probably groaning and thinking “damned if I do, damned if I don’t.”

Yes, it is a fine and tricky line to walk, but white authors should tread carefully, do lots of research, and must have good and honest intentions if they want their work to be taken seriously by people of color. That all goes without saying.

Now, I do want to clarify that my points are aimed specifically at middle-class, white authors who possess both earned and unearned privilege. At the very least, we can all agree that white, straight, cis-gendered authors from middle-class backgrounds (aka the group most likely to get published) have advantages in the publishing industry that people of color don’t — such as dominating the entire industry.

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